Instruction for Authors

 

The International Transport Law Review is an open-access e-journal. The submissions can be sent at any time to the Editorial (as detailed below), whereas the deadlines are only applied in case of thematic issues (ie, conference proceedings special issue).

 

Field of Interest

The International Transport Law Review publishes expert and scientific papers, case comments, national legislation and case law updates’ reports, book reviews (in particular with regard the master and doctoral thesis publications), conferences’, seminars’ and workshops’ comments, overviews of educational institutions’ courses in maritime and general transport law, and other types of contributions in the field of General Transport (Air, Road, Rail, Internal Waterways Navigation) Law, Admiralty, Maritime and Shipping Law, General Transport and Marine Insurance Law, Offshore Energy Law, International Trade Law, Law of Sea, Marine Environmental Law, and other related areas.

 

Each submission shall contain the following elements:

  • Title
  • Author/authors’ details (name and surname, academic title, professional position, personal e-mail address, name and address of the home institution)
  • Abstract (up to 250 words)
  • Keywords (up to 5 keywords)
  • Short author/authors’ biographical details (up to 100 words)

 

The materials for publication are to be submitted to:

International Transport Law Review
EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE
Subject: ITL Review Publication Submission
To: ITLR Executive Editors – intranlawrev@gmail.com

 

Each submission shall adhere to the following style and citation rules:

  • Main body of text, font: Cambria; font size: 12; line spacing: 1,5; no indentation.
  • Headers and sub-headers should use the following structure: 1. / 1.2. / 1.3. / 1.4.
  • Text must not contain any special formatting.
  • Footnotes are to be listed at the foot of each page, font: Cambria; font size: 10; line spacing: 1; no indentation.
  • All the citation of books, articles, cases must be done in the footnotes and not in the main body of the text.
  • The footnotes in the main body of text should be attached to the word (or last word of a sentence) to which they refer, after any punctuation:
    • Example: The terms of payment are set with regards to the moments which has best characterized the construction.1
  • The footnotes at the bottom of page should be followed by a blank space before the first word of the footnote, which must have a capital letter.
    • Example: 1 See clause 6 of Baltime.
  • Books should be cited as follows: author/authors’ name and surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma); title in italic; edition (if applicable), city followed by a colon, publisher and year in brackets; page(s)
    • Example: Alan Khee-Jin Tan, Vessel-Source Marine Pollution: the Law and Politics of International Regulation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 44 (if the pages are more than one: 44-48, or 44 ff.).
  • Edited volumes should be cited as follows: author/authors’ name and surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma); followed by “ed. or eds. (if more editors)”; title in italic; edition (if applicable), city followed by a colon, publisher and year in brackets; page(s) (if applicable)
    • Example: Massimiliano Musi (ed.), New Comparative Perspectives in Maritime, Transport and International Trade Law (Bologna: Liberia Bonomo Editrice, 2014).
  • Chapters in books should be cited as follows: author/authors’ name and surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma); title of chapter in italic; the word “in” not in italics, followed by “ed. or eds. (if more editors)”; title in italic; edition (if applicable), city followed by a colon, publisher and year in brackets; page(s)
    • Example: Julia Constantino Chagas Lessa, How wide are the shoulders of a Flag of Convenience Country?, in Massimiliano Musi (ed.), New Comparative Perspectives in Maritime, Transport and International Trade Law (Bologna: Liberia Bonomo Editrice, 2014), 227. (if the pages are more than one: 227-255, or 227 ff.).
  • Articles in journals should be cited as follows: author/authors’ name and surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma); title in italic; full name of the journal written in italic; information on the volume or issue if so required by the perspective journal’s citation recommendation; year of publication in brackets followed by a colon; page(s)
    • Example: Jan de Bruyne, Liability of Classification Societies: Cases, Challenges, and Future Perspectives, in Journal of Maritime Law & Commerce, 2014, 181. (if the pages are more than one: 181-185, or 181 ff.).
  • Cases should be cited in accordance with the official law reports of relevant jurisdictions
    • Example: Court of Appeal Antwerp, May 10, 1994, Rechtspraak Haven van Antwerpen (1995): 301.
  • Internet sources should be cited as follows: author/authors’ name and surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma) if available; title of the article/document written in italic; year, page(s); “available at” followed by a colon; name of portal where the article/document can be obtained; portal internet address, date of last access in brackets
  • Legal sources should be cited in accordance with the official law reports of relevant jurisdictions, or in accordance with relevant international law reports
    • Example: United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), United Nations Treaty Series: 1833, 1834, 1835.
  • If a source is being repeated more than once, the following specific rules should be adhered to:
    • if a source has been utilized in the previous footnote, with the exact same pages as relevant for the following footnote, the author/authors’ surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma) should be inserted, followed by the abbreviation: ibid. (written in italic)
      • Example: Footnote 1: Julia Constantino Chagas Lessa, How wide are the shoulders of a Flag of Convenience Country?, in Massimiliano Musi (ed.), New Comparative Perspectives in Maritime, Transport and International Trade Law (Bologna: Liberia Bonomo Editrice, 2014), 227.
      • Footnote 2: Constantino Chagas Lessa,
    • If a source has been utilized in the previous footnote, with different pages as from the current footnote, the author/authors’ surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma) should be inserted, followed by the abbreviation: id. (written in italic), followed by page(s)
      • Example: Footnote 1: Julia Constantino Chagas Lessa, How wide are the shoulders of a Flag of Convenience Country?, in Massimiliano Musi (ed.), New Comparative Perspectives in Maritime, Transport and International Trade Law (Bologna: Liberia Bonomo Editrice, 2014), 227.
      • Footnote 2: Constantino Chagas Lessa, id., 229.
    • If a source has been utilized in any other footnote apart from the previous one, the author/authors’ surname (if the authors are more than one, the names are separated with a comma) should be inserted, followed by the abbreviation “ cit.” (written in italic), followed by page(s)
      • Example: Footnote 1: Julia Constantino Chagas Lessa, How wide are the shoulders of a Flag of Convenience Country?, in Massimiliano Musi (ed.), New Comparative Perspectives in Maritime, Transport and International Trade Law (Bologna: Liberia Bonomo Editrice, 2014), 227.
      • Footnote 5: Constantino Chagas Lessa, cit., 231-235.